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Author Topic: Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.  (Read 5744 times)

Beware_the_Ides

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No "Celebrity Death Match" here, sorry.  I was wondering if someone could explain the difference between the two to me.  They seem to be used interchangeably in the following article (link to original) but the author also seems to imply that there is a difference.  The article didn't seem to expose any myths to me; however, in the way they define Charismatic Christians I think it may have created or perpetuated some.

I always thought the charismatics were those who waved their hands, jumped around and shouted praises for most of the service.  I seem to remember as a child my mother saying something about special charismatic services or congregations for people who were so moved.  While we're defining terms, how does this differ from evangelicals? mainline Protestants? orthodox Catholics?

Myths Exposed on Charismatic Christianity in America

By
Christian Post Reporter
Mon, Jan. 07 2008 04:28 PM ET
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Charismatic churches are growing in number in the Unites States, but many Americans still have inaccurate assumptions about the particular brand of Christianity, according to surveys released Monday.

Many people believe that charismatic Christianity is almost exclusively a Protestant phenomenon, but research shows that one-third of all U.S. Catholics (36 percent) fit the charismatic classification, according to the new Barna study. And nearly one-quarter of all charismatics in the U.S. (22 percent) are Catholics.

Charismatic Christians are defined in the study as those that say they have been “filled with the Holy Spirit” and believe in “charismatic gifts, such as tongues and healing, are still valid and active today.”

Another misconception is that charismatic churches belong to a strictly separate group of denominations. In reality, charismatic churches have crossed denominational boundaries in recent years. A Barna survey of senior pastors reveals that seven percent of Southern Baptist churches and six percent of mainline churches are charismatic.

There are also widespread beliefs that charismatic churches tend to be small, relatively unsophisticated congregations that are more likely to be led by female pastors. However, research suggests that congregations are about the same size as those of non-charismatic Protestant churches and are also actually more likely to use technological applications – including large screen projection systems – evaluated in the study.

Moreover, charismatic and non-charismatic Protestant churches have the same portion of churches led by a female senior pastor (nine percent).

Charismatic and Pentecostal Christians over the past decade have grown from about 30 percent to 36 percent of American adults, or about 80 million people. One out of every four Protestant churches in the United States (23 percent) is a charismatic congregation.

George Barna, who directed the research projects, commented that the growth in the charismatic and Pentecostal movements in America is not surprising because it matches the current cultural trend in mainstream society.

“The freedom of emotional and spiritual expression typical of charismatic assemblies parallels the cultural trend toward personal expression, accepting diverse emotions and allowing people to interpret their experiences in ways that make sense to them,” Barna explained. “It is not surprising that the Pentecostal community in America has been growing.”

He added that he expects charismatic Christianity will continue to grow.

“We are moving toward a future in which the charismatic-fundamentalist split will be an historical footnote rather than a dividing line within the body of believers,” Barna predicted. “Young Christians, in particular, have little energy for the arguments that have traditionally separated charismatics and non-charismatics. Increasing numbers of people are recognizing that there are more significant arenas in which to invest their resources.”

For the most part, the profile of the typical charismatic congregation is nearly the same as that of evangelical, fundamentalist and mainline Protestant churches. Four out of five (80 percent) have a full-time, paid pastor; the senior pastor is, on average, 52 years old (the same as other Protestant churches); and the weekly adult attendance is nearly equivalent to other Protestant bodies (82 adults at Pentecostal gatherings compared to 85 adults at all Protestant churches).

Yet there are significant differences between charismatic and non-charismatic congregations.

Non-charismatic congregations tend to have a larger annual operating budget, $149,000, compared to the budget of Pentecostal ministries with $136,000. Similarly, non-charismatic churches on average spent more in paying their senior pastor, $47,000 annually, than charismatic pastors who receive a compensation package averaging about $42,000.

Yet perhaps the biggest distinction between the two is the level of education of the pastors. A significant majority of senior pastors of non-charismatic churches (70 percent) have graduated from a seminary. In comparison, not quite half of charismatic pastors (49 percent) have a seminary degree.

The report is based on a nationwide telephone survey conducted by Barna in December 2007 among a random sample of 1,005 adults, age 18 and older. It also contains information from a nationwide phone survey among a random sample of 1,220 senior pastors of Protestant churches.

Memento, homo, quia pulvis es, et in pulverum reverteris

Sonoman

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Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2008, 03:13:PM »

Don't forget Charismatic Catholics, too.


Galway

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Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2008, 03:34:PM »
An example


kjvail

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Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2008, 04:44:PM »
Quote
No "Celebrity Death Match" here, sorry.  I was wondering if someone could explain the difference between the two to me.  They seem to be used interchangeably in the following article (link to original) but the author also seems to imply that there is a difference.  The article didn't seem to expose any myths to me; however, in the way they define Charismatic Christians I think it may have created or perpetuated some.


"Charismatic" usually refers to a worship style, specifically the chrism of γλωσσολαλια (glossolalia), hence its association with the Pentecostal sect (the apostles recieved this chrism and demonstrated it on Pentecost, see Acts 2). However when the apostles did it they were understood by those who heard them as if they had spoken in each's native language, I don't think anyone understands what modern charismatics are "saying". It's not limited to Pentecostals though, as has been mentioned, there are charismatic Catholics as well.
 Generically it refers to worship services with lots of people jumping about and making fools of themselves. It seems to a very ancient heresy, St. Paul had to rebuke the Corinthians for the same nonsense. Perhaps it is no coincidence he also rebuked them for allowing women to teach and this heresy is now very strong in the feminized Christianity of the 20th century.
Charismatics seem to ignore St. Paul's admonishment to the Corinthians that takes up nearly a 1/3 of that letter. In any case, a common theology among Pentecostals is to assert one is not "saved" if he doesn't speak in tongues. I can't tell you how destructive this is. Young men I've worked with, who have been swept up in these sects, in the bowels of despair because they "cannot" speak in tongues. (I'm talking in tears, borderline suicidal)
If you look at protestantism as having three "schools" of theology (neo-orthodox {nothing to do with Catholic orthodoxy of course, this is Luther and Calvin as interpreted by Karl Barth}, liberal and evangelical) then Pentecostalism typically falls into the "neo-orthodox" category  whereas Evangelicalism is its own theological school which has drawn from both the neo-orthodox and liberal paradigms.
It's native to the U.S. although it has spread to Europe and elsewhere. Pentecostalism is congregationalist however, so your results may vary. The theology of any given sect is dependent on the theology of its leaders.
Pax Tecum,
Kevin V.

"I am a converted pagan living among apostate puritans"
- C.S. Lewis

"In the world it is called Tolerance, but in hell it is called Despair, the sin that believes in nothing, cares for nothing, seeks to know nothing, interferes with nothing, enjoys nothing, hates nothing,

Nightshade057

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Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2008, 05:36:PM »
Oy. I didn't realize just how widespread this problem was. 

Christ have mercy.


I'm working on a little mini-exposé of the Charismatic movement with a few friends. I'll post it here when it's done.
~ Joshua

"The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of true art and true science. Whoever does not know it and can no longer wonder, no longer marvel, is as good as dead, and his eyes are dimmed."
-Albert Einstein

"Truth does not change according to our ability to stomach it." - Flannery O'Connor

"In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act." - George Orwell


aquinasavio

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Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2008, 05:43:PM »
Quote from: Nightshade057
Oy. I didn't realize just how widespread this problem was.  

Christ have mercy.


I'm working on a little mini-exposé of the Charismatic movement with a few friends. I'll post it here when it's done.
It is an incredibly widespread problem.  At the Youth Group that I attend, you are really just expected to fit into the "Charismatic" category when you walk through the door.  That being said, they respect my position and do not require me to participate in the charismatic prayer at adoration.

Michael_G

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Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2008, 05:50:PM »

The 18th century English writer Samuel Johnson came up with a phrase that might answer your question:  "There is no settling the point of precedency between a louse and a flea."

Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in the hour of conflict.  Be our safeguard against the wickedness and snares of the Devil.  May God rebuke him, we humbly pray; and do though, O prince of the Heavenly host, thrust Satan down to hell and with him all the wicked spirits that wander through the world for the ruin of souls.

StrictCatholicGirl

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Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2008, 07:19:PM »
Without bringing my own prejudices into the picture, I would simply say "Pentecostalism" is a branch of Protestantism - a denomination, while "Charismatic" is a movement that penetrates all walls.
 
Nightshade, I look forward to reading your mini-expose!
 
- Lisa

Beware_the_Ides

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Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2008, 09:10:PM »

Quote from: Galway
An example

I saw that video somewhere else (perhaps another thread).  That is what comes to mind when I think of charismatic services and what I pictured when my mother described it when I was younger.

The assistant chaplain at my parish (FSSP) is a newly ordained thirty-year-old who is very much into developing the youth group.  Unfortunately, I've seen evidence that some of this is trying to infiltrate with it.  I seem to recall the assistant chaplain remarking that many of the youth he had talked to from NO parishes were turned off by this "touchy feely" stuff.  However, there is one young gentleman zealot who now attends our chapel attempting to be an "individual."  Instead of genuflecting, he pulls this crap of making the sign of the cross, kissing his fingers and then bending over and touching the back of his two fingers to the floor.  Besides not even making an effort to pay attention to the mass (i.e. when to sit, kneel, stand) this substitute for genuflection makes me want to smack him in the back of the neck. (Is that wrong?)

Memento, homo, quia pulvis es, et in pulverum reverteris

Beware_the_Ides

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Charismatic vs. Pentecostal vs. Evangelical, etc.
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2008, 09:47:PM »
Quote from: StrictCatholicGirl
Without bringing my own prejudices into the picture, I would simply say "Pentecostalism" is a branch of Protestantism - a denomination, while "Charismatic" is a movement that penetrates all walls.
  
- Lisa

Well stated.  Thanks!

Memento, homo, quia pulvis es, et in pulverum reverteris