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Author Topic: Gregorian in modern notation  (Read 1612 times)
glgas
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« on: February 25, 2010, 07:13:AM »

http://jeandelalande.org/HOME/MODERN_notation_chant.htm
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Resurrexi
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« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2010, 06:24:PM »

Reading Gregorian chant in modern notation is like reading Greek that's been transliterated into the Latin alphabet.
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glgas
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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2010, 08:56:AM »

Reading Gregorian chant in modern notation is like reading Greek that's been transliterated into the Latin alphabet.

I would say instead reading Greek text in English. I myself read the 4 line notation easily, but the majority of more familiar with the regular five line notes.

Just try to compare the 1922 antiphonal (without punctuation for rhythm) with the 1962 Liber Usualis (heavily punctuated  for rhythm). We need help what we understand.
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Rosarium
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2010, 10:18:AM »

Reading Gregorian chant in modern notation is like reading Greek that's been transliterated into the Latin alphabet.

It is like reading texts in a descendent of the Phoenician script, instead of the original cuneiform.
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piabee
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« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2010, 05:17:PM »

The easiest way to learn four-line notation is to become familiar with some music in modern notation, and then switch. That way you learn to read the notes from the melody instead of the opposite.
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glgas
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Posts: 4,219


« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2010, 06:13:PM »

The easiest way to learn four-line notation is to become familiar with some music in modern notation, and then switch. That way you learn to read the notes from the melody instead of the opposite.

The traditional learning was in choir with experienced singers mixed with the new ones: the learners just listened to the older ones.
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yosupman
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« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2010, 10:53:PM »

Really the whole point is knowing where middle C is.  Then you know where your half steps and whole steps are.  4 or five lines of music doesn't matter at all.  Its getting  used to singing around where middle C is on the staff.  A  lot of musicians, like violists have to read alto cleft, then switch to treble cleft, etc.  It takes good ol' practice.  I used to practice violin 6-8 hours a day.
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glgas
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« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2010, 09:51:AM »

Really the whole point is knowing where middle C is.  Then you know where your half steps and whole steps are.  4 or five lines of music doesn't matter at all.  Its getting  used to singing around where middle C is on the staff.  A  lot of musicians, like violists have to read alto cleft, then switch to treble cleft, etc.  It takes good ol' practice.  I used to practice violin 6-8 hours a day.

This is true, until you keep the supposition that the modern notation is necessarily on fixed frequencies. The Gregorian is plain chant, without any instrument, you do not need fixed frequencies regardless of the notation. The intoning cantor shall find the proper level to start, and from that point the plain chant is floating.

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CantateDomino
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« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2010, 10:45:AM »

Reading Gregorian chant in modern notation is like reading Greek that's been transliterated into the Latin alphabet.

I find it more difficult to read chant in "modern" notation now.  It's not that hard.  Once you know where "do" is, you're good to go.  The subtle rhythm, expressive lengthening, and note groupings are lost when put into modern notation.  Every neum is unique, and is sung a certain way based on the neum itself.  5-line staves work great for other music...but not for chant.
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